All posts filed under: Interviews

Q&A with author Colleen Gleason

First of all Colleen, would you like to tell me a little bit about yourself, and what got you into writing to begin with? I’ve been writing stories since I was very young, in elementary school (one of my first efforts was a version of my classmates and me in a Gilligan’s Island sort of story. It’s long buried!) I wrote all through high school and college, but didn’t actually finish a book until after I’d graduated college and was working full time. I went on to write eight books in total, trying to sell each of them to a publisher, until I wrote and, with the help of my agent, sold my ninth book to a division of Penguin Books in late 2005. That book was released in 2007, and since then I’ve written and published eleven novels (five as Colleen Gleason, three as Colette Gale, and three as Joss Ware). Sometimes, I’m not sure who I am when I wake up in the morning! What gave you the idea to blend a modern-day …

Q&A with author Steph Broadribb

The first question has to be, how did a girl from Birmingham (in the UK) end up training as a bounty hunter, in the US? It was all in the name of research! Once I knew that Lori Anderson would be a bounty hunter I knew I needed to find out as much as I could about the realities of that job—and about how it felt being a woman in the largely male dominated profession of bounty hunting – in order to make Lori as a character, and the story itself, as authentic as possible. I researched it online and via books and TV, but there’s no substitute to getting out there and finding things out first hand. By flying over to California and training with a really experienced bounty hunter, and in getting to speak with some great women who do the job for real, I felt better able to write about Lori’s world and all the challenges she faces. What part (if any) of your training as a bounty hunter formed the basis …

Q&A with author Kathleen Kent

First of all, would you like to tell us a little about yourself. I grew up in Texas and attended UT at Austin studying literature and history.  What I wanted to be was a writer, but my dad, who was a very practical man, convinced me that being a starving artist was not all it was cracked up to be.  Instead, he argued, I should study business, get a “real” job and write in my spare time.  Which is what I eventually did.  After college I lived and worked in New York for twenty years:  10 years working for the former Chairman of the Commodity Exchange, and then for another 10 years as a civilian contractor to the U.S. Department of Defense in Russia facilitating defense conversion work, converting military plants into civilian use.  I wrote a lot during those 10 years, but almost all of it was factual progress reporting to my coordinating CO in Washington. I did very little creative writing as my job was all consuming, leaving not much time, or energy, to commit to writing a …